Corydon Times

Tia McElvain and Heather Moorman grab the torch
Heather Moorman, left, and Tia McElvain. Photo by Jason Selby
WAYNE COUNTY FAIR QUEEN CO-CHAIRS PREPARE FOR PASSING OF THE TIARA AND CHANGING OF THE LIGHT BULBS

Heather Moorman wears a blue Wayne County Fair T-shirt. Tia McElvain sports French tip fingernails and is always ready for a photo op. Together, these two friends go through the rigor of organizing the Wayne County Fair Queen Pageant as co-chairs. They know glamour is in the eye of the beholder—sometimes you’re tugging around livestock, other times you’re wearing the crown.

Moorman’s father, Leroy Perkins, will be going into his 50th year as secretary manager of the Wayne County Fair, which will turn 101 years old. Her mother Pat has always been right there helping, too. In addition to her pageant duties, Moorman is now in the position her father began in, assistant secretary. Moorman has helped her father clean toilets, as Perkins helped his father clean toilets at the fairgrounds. If the show is to go on, someone has to replace the light bulbs destroyed by vandals each year. Moorman has helped her father with that, too.

Jun 20, 2016, 09:19


Wayne Theatre celebrates 25 years at the movies
The Art Deco Wayne Theatre of Corydon today. Photo by Jason Selby
2016 IS ALSO 80TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF ICONIC ART DECO BUILDING ON THE CORYDON SQUARE

Before May of 1991, there was no movie theater in Wayne County for six years. The doors had closed in 1985, coinciding with the farm crisis. Customers had to take their business out of town. It further stressed the local economy.

When the Wayne Theatre—which is the official name of the venue, though ‘theater’ became the popular spelling in the latter part of the 20th century in America—opened in August of 1936, it quickly gained a reputation as one of the best in Iowa. At the time, it had the largest screen in the state. In the golden age of movies, Wayne County was home to a state-of-the-art Art Deco building with excellent acoustics. In 1939, carbon arc projectors were installed to show 'Gone With the Wind.'

Jun 13, 2016, 13:04


Alaska native Dr. Joshwa Tromblee joins WCHCS staff
Dr. Joshwa Tromblee of the Wayne County Hospital and Clinic System.
ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR MIKE THOMAS HELPS DO FIND A HOME IN RURAL IOWA AFTER DODGING VOLCANIC ASH AND INTENSE DESERT HEAT

Dr. Joshwa Tromblee is accustomed to transitions. When he was 10 years old, his family moved from California to the Kenai Peninsula of Alaska. After high school graduation, he went from cold ocean air to the miserable desert heat of Eastern New Mexico University. Then it was on to Iowa. Tromblee is the newest addition to the staff at Wayne County Hospital and Clinic System of Corydon.

Tromblee’s parents are now retired. His father worked for the postal service and his mother ran a daycare. Many of the children he went to school with had fathers who were fishermen or oil and natural gas workers.

The small coastal town of Kenai, population 7,500, is located in southcentral Alaska. National forests, parks and preserves surround where Tromblee grew up. Though he rarely missed school because of cold or snow, on more than one occasion classes were cancelled because of the eruption of a volcano.

Jun 6, 2016, 10:03


Our Iowa features work of David and Linda Grismore
The Grismores’ photograph, of Brian and Nancy Taylor’s bull at sunset, now appears in Our Iowa magazine.
PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN WITH FUJI CAMERA COUPLE WON AT CLIO FEST

It was a lovely sunset, one that both David and Linda Grismore marveled at before they reached for their respective cameras. They are shutterbugs. They are not in competition, but this time David got the best shot. As usual, Linda went to work editing—whoever takes the photo, it is a joint effort for the Wayne Community High School grads.

They knew it was good—the silhouette of a neighbor’s bull and a barbwire fence against a sky drowning in the sun’s dying rays, radiant. So they sent it to Our Iowa magazine.

Jun 1, 2016, 10:26


Locals recall CCC legacy by pointing to Corydon Lake Park
Civilian Conservation Corps, Company 777, Corydon, Sept. 4, 1940. Richard Frye of Corydon’s father, Dan Frye, was a CCC boy, pictured above, second row, fourth from right. While working at the CCC camp, Dan met his future bride Emma Hartsook. Emma’s family owned a café in Corydon.
When Eula Henderson started high school in Corydon in 1940, the Civilian Conservation Corps camp had already planted itself in Wayne County. It was located north of Highway 2, west of where the old Neely Manufacturing building stands. Most of the trees at Corydon Lake Park owe their existence to the camp.

“I certainly remember,” Henderson said. “At the time, country girls had to come to town to stay with an aunt and uncle or grandma or something, because there weren’t any buses. Nobody had cars. You didn’t go out riding around. I suppose those boys walked into town. I know us girls walked.

“On the south side of the square was The Big Dipper—it was an ice cream place. It was the west third of what’s Gambles now. It had a soda fountain and chairs and all that, and the back was partitioned off for a dance floor, and they had a jukebox.”

May 16, 2016, 08:56













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