Corydon Times

Macey Goretska achieves pinnacle of career in Colorado
After they won grand champion at the National Western Stock Show in Denver, Macey Goretska leads her steer Remi into the Brown Palace Hotel. Photograph courtesy of Kathryn Scott Osler, The Denver Post
WAYNE SOPHOMORE AND HER STEER REMI WIN GRAND CHAMPION AT NATIONAL WESTERN STOCK SHOW IN DENVER

Last year at the National Western Stock Show in Denver, Macey Goretska’s steer finished sixth in its weight class. To her taste, it was a disappointing trip. It is the Super Bowl of junior livestock shows. It could also be compared to the Miss America pageant, except with cows.

Macey is a 16-year-old sophomore at Wayne Community High School. She has been showing cattle since she was three-years-old. Her first rodeo, so to speak, was at the Wayne County Fair.

She has shown a steer at the National Western Stock Show every January since she was nine-years-old. Visiting Colorado has become an annual event.

Feb 8, 2016, 08:42


In hunt for better grain bin, Charles Shivvers grew Wayne County
After he patented and developed his grain dryer, before the design of the Country Clipper, Charles Shivvers made coffee. Photo by Jason Selby
AFTER SURVIVING FARM CRISIS, SHIVVERS MANUFACTURING REMAINS ONE OF SOUTHERN IOWA’S MAJOR INDEPENDENT EMPLOYERS

In the beginning, turkeys brought Charles Shivvers and his family to Wayne County. It was a modest start for what would become in Shivvers Manufacturing one of the largest independent employers in southern Iowa.

“We lived in Marion County and farmed there on 365 acres,” said Charles’ son Carl, now president of his father’s company. They owned one acre of land for each day of the year.

A friend of Homer Grismore had given Charles a heads up about the benefits of the turkey business. Therefore Charles sold his farm and moved to Wayne County in the 1950s.

“He bought his first chicks from Homer, and had a big hatchery,” Carl said. “He raised turkeys for the first few years, before converting to regular farming for a while.”

Feb 1, 2016, 08:57


Ted Cobb once hooked the country on his catfish bait
From left to right, a package of devil worms, a tool used by the Cobb family to string lures, and a salamander spinner. Photo by Jason Selby
Unlike the other entrepreneurs John J. Clayton opined upon in his March 1957 article ‘The Corydon Way,’ Ted Cobb had not yet made it big by the time The Iowan magazine hit the stands. Clayton offered only a prediction:

“Another idea which will one day spring into a thriving industry is the property of a local angler. Ted Cobb has spent half of his 37 years on the bank of a pond or stream with a fishing rod in his hand.”

Many fishermen in Iowa and throughout the country used Cobb’s bait, his lures or a combination of both most likely without knowing they were doing so. The Gambles store in Corydon always had his product in stock. It was a staple of the fishing industry.

If the fish were biting, it probably was not a coincidence one of Cobb’s flies was hooked to the pole. A salamander with a silver spinner dazzled bass with its magic. As an angler, Cobb knew what worked.

Jan 25, 2016, 08:49


Nation still clears roads with help from late Frank Coates
The old Coates Manufacturing building, with a Coates snowplow out front, just north of the Corydon square.
BEFORE WAYNE COUNTY INVENTOR PATENTED HIS STEEL PLOW, HIGHWAYS WERE SHOVELED WITH WOOD IMPLEMENTS

Like several of the other men mentioned in the March 1957 The Iowan article ‘The Corydon Way,’ Frank Coates Sr. could boast many patents to his name. Per capita, Wayne County might have been one of the patent capitols of the world during the mid-20th century.

However, unlike some of his contemporaries, Coates could not boast a world-class education. A farm kid attending a country school, the engineering genius only graduated from eighth grade.

Jan 18, 2016, 09:08


Duncan Blount finds the market ripe for storytelling
Duncan and Alyssa Blount with Lu Lu at their North Carolina home.
When Duncan Blount moved to Iowa in 2009, it was a calculated gamble. He came to Wayne County from North Carolina for love, even though the object of his affection, Alyssa Godden, was not yet his girlfriend. At that point she was only a summer dream on the lake at Bobwhite State Park in Allerton, a pen pal separated by over 1,000 miles.

Blount reasoned that even if Alyssa had never returned his affection, he would have an earnest shoulder to lean on in grandmother and sage Lorena Blount. That would have been salve enough.

“My real value for stories comes from my grandmother Lorena and how her joy of sharing memories—and that of Iowans in general—translated to my joy of sharing stories,” Blount said. “I remember being a young boy and visiting Iowa in the summers and asking my grandma, ‘Tell me this story—tell me the story of how Brownie, my dad’s pony, almost stepped on a rattlesnake.’ These little but transformative tales brought me so much happiness."

Jan 11, 2016, 08:46













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