Corydon Times

Jenna Lain lays down the law in her new role
The Honorable Jenna Lain working hard in her new office at the Wayne County Courthouse. In November of 2016, Lain became the second female to serve as Judicial Magistrate in Corydon. Photo by Jason Selby
LAST NOVEMBER 12, LAIN BECAME ONLY THE SECOND FEMALE JUDICIAL MAGISTRATE IN WAYNE COUNTY HISTORY

Local attorney Jenna Lain has served her community in many ways, from referring clients for psychiatric help to pulling calves, from leading the Rotary Club as president to resolving traffic tickets.

In November of 2016, the Honorable John Birdwell retired his position as Wayne County Judicial Magistrate after six years of duty. Lain is serving the rest of his term while still taking private clients. She interviewed for the position last Election Day and began the job the following weekend.

Lain is only the second female to be named Judicial Magistrate in Wayne County history. The first was the Honorable Sheila Harned.

Feb 13, 2017, 10:30


Dale Clark remolds history of Iowa in clay
Dale Clark at Corydon State Bank with pottery molded to replicate native work. Photo by Jason Selby
1976 SEYMOUR GRAD WILL DISPLAY ARTWORK BASED ON ORIGINAL NATIVE DESIGNS FROM THE WAUBONSIE TRAIL

What is now Wayne County was once the site of the Waubonsie Trail, named after Chief Waubonsie of the Pottowatomie Tribe, who died near Tabor around 1848. The native people left tools and pottery on their path from village to village. That route became the main road through southern Iowa today.

“The Waubonsie Trail is basically Highway 2,” local fossil hunter Dale Clark said. “It was a trail all the way across southern Iowa that started the first dirt road—it was a path from the Indians, then a dirt road, then a rock road, then Highway 3, then Highway 2.

“When it was becoming the Waubonsie Trail itself, the farmer that owned the land in the area, he was to maintain it. It had signs across it that said, ‘Seymour, so far,’ and it was marked with white segments on post.”

Feb 6, 2017, 10:00


Wade Harman heads back to the Super Bowl
During Atlanta’s 44-21 victory in the 2017 NFC Championship game, the Falcons’ Julio Jones leaps to catch a pass as Wayne grad and Atlanta tight ends coach Wade Harman’s son Hunter Harman, in gray, watches the play. Photo courtesy of the Atlanta Falcons
FORMER WAYNE FALCONS LINEBACKER WILL COACH ATLANTA FALCONS AGAINST NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS ON FEB. 5

You do not need to be a sports fan to know the Super Bowl is a big deal in the United States, whether that is a healthy sign for the country or not. Some see it as America’s Circus Maximus. A few stadiums are even named Coliseums. The halftime pageantry and multimillion dollar advertisements almost catch up to some of the egos of the oversized, overpaid players. On occasion, referees can use a tuck rule as an excuse to change the outcome of a playoff game. There are steroids, spy cameras and CTE.

But there are also good stories about decent people. Sometimes a Wayne Falcon can plow through the Bluegrass Conference defense at Saling Field in Corydon, Iowa, a small town of 1,500 people, and then over 30 years later help the Atlanta Falcons make it to the Super Bowl against the Patriot empire—football fans either love New England or they hate them.

Jan 30, 2017, 09:56


Bob Rockhold recalls moving day and Mickey Mantle
Longtime guidance counselor Bob Rockhold. Photo by Jason Selby
SERVED 40 YEARS AS GUIDANCE COUNSELOR AND TEACHER OF LINEVILLE AND WAYNE COMMUNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Bob Rockhold considered his father Ivan the best baseball player he had ever seen. Rockhold’s superintendent when he attended Lineville was Mickey Mantle’s high school coach. Everything is relative. For many Americans, Mantle will always be the greatest, but in Wayne County for some folks, there was no one quite like Ivan Rockhold.

“People always used to say they thought he could’ve played at a pretty high level,” Rockhold said of his father. “But he graduated when he was 16, and waited a year on my mother, she graduated at 17, and they got married, and then he just played town team ball.

“But he was super fast and strong. Dad and Red Petty, either one, would hit a homerun every game.”

Jan 23, 2017, 14:01


Allerton graduate Larry Abel shares his second life
Larry Abel, an Allerton High School graduate, is one of the worlds’ longest survivors of a heart transplant, which he received in May of 1984. Photo courtesy of Chris Zoeller, The Globe Gazette, globegazette.com.
Larry Abel is one of the longest living survivors of a heart transplant in the world. In 1984, he underwent the most invasive of surgeries, followed by months of painful recuperation and physical therapy. But by autumn of the same year, Abel had enrolled at the University of Northern Iowa. He earned his master’s degree in school administration a year after receiving a new heart.

“At the time, the doctors said in 10 years, of the 10 of us that were transplanted, seven would be gone,” Abel said. The operation was performed at the University of Minnesota. “I’ve been very fortunate. I’m appreciative of the quality of life—not that there haven’t been bumps in the road, because there have been. Longevity doesn’t mean a whole lot if you don’t have some quality.

“I feel blessed to receive the gift of life through a transplant, and to be able to go on and hopefully make a little difference someplace in the world.”

Jan 16, 2017, 10:56













Search