Corydon Times

Garden Road - April 26, 2016
South of the Morton machine shed on the farm where I grew up, there was an old barn almost too old to stand. Its spine was bent. In April, rain turned the pasture green, the dirt black. Barn swallows made it their home. I was amazed by their agility; at dusk they could almost be confused for bats. They wove patterns through windows no longer containing glass, out the door too high for a child not to have to climb down to exit—it was meant for the height of hay wagons. There was still straw in the barn, but it must have been decades old, from a small round baler. Darkness assigned the doorway to the barn a sinister pall. I was too afraid to enter it after sundown.
Apr 26, 2016, 09:04


Garden Road - April 19, 2016
The date of this newspaper coincides with a now two decades old historical event, the terrorist bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, which took place April 19, 1995. In an iconic photograph, a firefighter carries an infant from the scene of the carnage, from the daycare center. The baby is limp, bloody and covered in soot. She would later die as a result of her injuries.
Apr 18, 2016, 13:07


Garden Road - April 12, 2016
After graduating from Wayne Community High School, both my brother and sister attended Central College in Pella. Thirty acres of Oregon tulips, covering this month’s Corydon State Bank calendar, reminded me of those years. The bedroom the three of us shared was split apart by bookshelves my grandfather Paul Jackson built, and Grant slept on the foldout davenport in the living room during weekends home and summer. Neither Grant nor Angela had lived away from the farmhouse until they were 18—and only Angela had been out of the states of Iowa or Missouri, on a Falcon band trip to Colorado.
Apr 11, 2016, 09:19


Garden Road - April 5, 2016
At this time of year in my youth, my family would have been preparing the garden north of our house for planting. We owned a green tiller, probably from Gambles, and a smaller red tiller. Sometimes they started when you pulled the cord. Other times they did not. The upright tools drank gasoline and walked between rows of carrots, onions and beets. In the garage, my father kept Doc Ingraham’s old garden tiller, which he assembled himself from old parts. It was a family heirloom, but my father thought he might be able to tune it up and get it running again.
Apr 4, 2016, 09:02


Garden Road - March 29, 2016
There is both a danger and a necessity at looking into the past. Some have famously said those who ignore history are doomed to repeat it. Others are somewhat more cynical, and claim studying the past only allows us to better repeat it.
Mar 28, 2016, 09:10













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