Corydon Times

Dusti Relph becomes first woman judge in Iowa District 5B
The Honorable Dustria Relph. Photo by Jason Selby
WAYNE GRAD WORKED AS A NURSE FOR 18 YEARS BEFORE BECOMING AN ATTORNEY IN HER HOMETOWN OF CORYDON

On a farm not far from the Missouri border, close to where the stone bases of the famed barnstorming Shane Hill baseball team once practiced, Dusti Relph rode her horse Doc in moonlight, hunting raccoons with her father, Jim Dickerson.

Other days, she would ride her bicycle through the streets of Corydon or spend her summers at the swimming pool in the late 1970s, while her mother Roberta Chambers practiced law.

“Once I got into junior high, I was real active in 4-H, sports and clubs,” Relph said. “I think that taught leadership skills.”

From this humble beginning, the Honorable Dusti Relph now begins her duties as district judge—the first woman to serve in that capacity in the history of Iowa’s fifth judicial district, which includes Polk County.

Sep 8, 2014, 08:55


Savings Incentive Program gives Matt Roe road map to success
Matt Roe stands among rows of blueberry bushes planted two years ago at Terraceberry Farm west of Corydon. Photo by Jason Selby
PRACTICAL FARMERS OF IOWA, BASED OUT OF AMES, MATCHES MENTORS WITH YOUNG AGRICULTURAL ENTREPRENEURS AROUND THE STATE

Strawberries, blueberries and honey—an atypical assortment on a southern Iowa farm, but one that Matt Roe can call his own. Roe was not raised with an agricultural background. He did not inherit the family farm, nor did he grow up on one. He attended Iowa State University to study horticulture under Dr. Nick Christians, but found tending golf courses for rich duffers in Edwards, Colo. unfulfilling.

“Lots of mundane, doing the same thing all day, making everything look extra perfect and beautiful for a bunch of rich guys to go out and play golf,” Roe said. “And just the excessive use of water and pesticides, and all the chemicals—it’s just a tremendous amount, especially out west where water is such a concern. They had to irrigate every single day. Kind of in a desert, some of those parts, then you’ve got this lush, beautiful golf course. I just wasn’t too passionate about that."

Sep 4, 2014, 09:13


Taekwondo black belt Amy Nyberg competes at World Expo
Amy Nyberg at the Taekwondo World Expo in Little Rock, Ark.
SENIOR AT WAYNE COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL FINDS INNER PEACE THROUGH PUNCHES, KICKS AND NUNCHUKS

Amy Nyberg, a senior at Wayne Community High School, began Taekwondo as a nine-year-old when her family still lived in Minnesota. When they moved to rural southern Iowa, Nyberg wasn’t sure she wanted to start over, to try a new style of the popular martial art. Instructor and third degree black belt Jackie Gunzenhauser of the Humeston Black Belt Academy convinced her to give it another try. Now, at the age of 16, Nyberg is a first-degree black belt.

“It’s fun,” Nyberg said, when asked what keeps her going back to the dojang. “There’s something you can always work on. The people are really nice. I just love to do it.”

Aug 22, 2014, 13:08


Prairie Trails Family Aquatic Center gets progressive
Above, PTFAC staff members Carly Nekvinda, Amber Johnson, Mandie Gassman, Josie Curry, Paige Johnson, Alex Chapman, Nic Johnson and Connor Runyon attempt to revive Mary Downs. Photo by Jason Selby
Intrepid community volunteer and spokesperson Cheri Nessen has turned her attention to taking Prairie Trails Family Aquatic Center down a safer, greener path. The Corydon pool has moved away from Red Cross techniques to Jeff Ellis & Associates, the leader in aquatic industry for lifeguard training, contracted by many large aquatic theme parks. Nessen has also employed the use of sphagnum moss, which limits the amount of chlorine necessary to keep water clean—a technique few pools have yet to use. The results are increased safety and health for swimmers.

“[Ellis is] different from other lifeguard companies,” Nessen said, as she instructed lifeguard Josie Curry to lead a demonstration in scanning of the water for potential trouble.

Aug 15, 2014, 11:00


Prairie Trails Museum celebrates 50th anniversary of cornerstone dedication
Former Iowa Governor Robert Ray and wife visit the main street exhibit at Corydon's Prairie Trails Museum.
On Aug. 15, 50 years will have passed since the Freemasons laid the cornerstone during a ceremony for what would become Prairie Trails Museum of Wayne County in Corydon. On that same date, the cornerstone for the new Wayne County Courthouse was set in place, on the square just east of the old jurisprudence building where a member of the Jesse James gang, Clell Miller, was tried for the robbery of the Ocobock Bank. The defendant’s chair that Miller sat in reposes now in the museum, toward the back of the Main Street display.

Among items included in both cornerstones were copies of the ‘Times-Republican,’ ‘The Humeston New Era’ and the ‘Seymour Herald.’

Aug 15, 2014, 10:18













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