Corydon Times

Anne Jaeckel and Wayne marching band make it 20 straight
Gabriella Buban, in white, and the Wayne Community High School marching band erupt after the announcement of their 20th victory at the 2014 Oktoberfest in Ottumwa. To the left, a rival band experiences the agony of defeat, as one girl can only throw up her hands at the Falcons’ success. Photo by Heidi Bellon
STUDENTS AND RESPECTED INSTRUCTOR SHARE INSIGHTS AND REASONS BEHIND UNPRECEDENTED OKTOBERFEST SUCCESS

Before Sat., Oct. 4, every member of the Wayne Community High School marching band knew exactly what it would mean to win this year’s Oktoberfest in Ottumwa—20 triumphs in 20 attempts. The leader of the band dynasty the past two decades, Anne Jaeckel, prepared her troops the same way as usual. There was no reason to change a system that works.

Jaeckel started teaching music at Wayne in the fall of 1993, replacing Jennifer Rieck. Jaeckel graduated from high school in 1982 from Platteville, Wis. She received her bachelors from the University of Wisconsin-Platteville in 1987, and her masters degree in conducting from the University of Northern Iowa in 1989.

“I was one of those rare people—I started as a music major and I ended as a music major,” Jaeckel said. “I was a good performer, but I never thought I’d be a performance major. I played euphonium. There’s not a lot of call for euphonium players unless you go into the military."

Oct 13, 2014, 09:02


Clayton Kiefer sets national record with 11 touchdowns
Clayton Kiefer, 10, a foot away from scoring his first of a national record 11 touchdowns in Wayne’s Monday night homecoming win over Twin Cedars, 86-60. After throwing a block for his older brother, Carson Kiefer, 3, watches as Clayton stiff arms a path to the endzone through the Sabers Otis Roby, 5. Photo by Jason Selby
Clayton Kiefer sprints past the Saber defense for a 22-yard touchdown, his 11th score of the night, breaking Nate Meier’s previous national record. Urging him on is Falcon quarterback Trent Moore, 8. Photo by Scott Schick
BREAKS SINGLE-GAME EIGHT-MAN FOOTBALL MARK FORMERLY HELD BY IOWA HAWKEYE DEFENSIVE END NATE MEIER

When Clayton Kiefer sits down at the 'Times-Republican,' his parents, Kelly and Jolene, apologize on his behalf. He has another interview with a radio station in the middle of this interview. Soon enough, Clayton’s phone rings, and he hurries to answer. It is his second radio interview in the span of one hour. Earlier in the week, Clayton also appeared in an Andy Hamilton article about the running back’s single-game national record of 11 touchdowns against Twin Cedars, in the Oct. 1 edition of 'The Des Moines Register.'

For the Kiefer family, it was 11 touchdowns for their 11 children. It seemed difficult, though, for Clayton to accept one for himself. When asked how it feels to hold a national high school record, Clayton said, “Pretty good, I guess.”

“He’s a man of few words,” mother Jolene laughed.

Oct 6, 2014, 09:13


After watching films at the Wayne Theatre, Ali Faulkner now stars in them
Ali Faulkner. Deidhra Fahey photo
When Ali Faulkner was young, she ate popcorn and perused films at the Wayne Theatre in Corydon. Now, if she returned on the right weekend, Faulkner might see herself on the silver screen. The day of her interview with the 'Times-Republican,' Sept. 26, was opening day for 'The Song,' in which she plays Rose Jordan, opposite Alan Powell’s portrayal of fictional musician Jed King. The day before, Elisabeth Hasselbeck interviewed the young actress on 'Fox & Friends,' while Faulkner was in New York City doing press for her new movie.

“I have so many memories [of Corydon],” Faulkner said. “I love Corydon. I spent a lot of time there, and it’s very close to my heart.” Some of her favorite recollections come from staying with her grandparents, Norm and Mary Jo Riekens, and attending the annual Old Settlers celebration.

Sep 29, 2014, 08:44


Paul Epperly reflects on his years in town he still calls home
Former Wayne head football coach Paul Epperly, with wife Pat behind him, prepare to stand before the first crowd at what they did not yet know would be called Epperly Field. In the distance to the far left, Wayne athletic director Scott Valentine prepares to pull down the cover from the scoreboard. Also pictured are the Falcons’ 2014 captains, from left, Ridge Downard, Blayde Baker, Clayton Kiefer and Carson Kiefer. Photo by Jason Selby
1958 LINEVILLE GRAD AND FORMER WAYNE FOOTBALL COACH AND TEACHER HONORED WITH UNVEILING OF EPPERLY FIELD

Paul Epperly recalls the excitement of an opening game victory, 6-0 over Mount Ayr in 1969, as the tipping point for the Falcons football program. Forty-five years later, Epperly and wife, Pat, drove from their home in Arkansas for the first game of the season in the new Saling Athletic Complex.

The 2014 football version of his old school scored 50 points this night—their lowest total this year. The game has changed, and not just because Wayne currently plays eight-man.

But the biggest surprise and adjustment for the old ball coach remained the new scoreboard, covered until just before the game. Standing on the unpainted stadium track with his wife and the captains of the football team, Epperly glanced to his left to watch the cover dropped, as announcer Jared Chambers shouted: ‘Epperly Field.’ Paul Epperly had no idea beforehand about this honor he would receive.

Sep 22, 2014, 09:57


Dusti Relph becomes first woman judge in Iowa District 5B
The Honorable Dustria Relph. Photo by Jason Selby
WAYNE GRAD WORKED AS A NURSE FOR 18 YEARS BEFORE BECOMING AN ATTORNEY IN HER HOMETOWN OF CORYDON

On a farm not far from the Missouri border, close to where the stone bases of the famed barnstorming Shane Hill baseball team once practiced, Dusti Relph rode her horse Doc in moonlight, hunting raccoons with her father, Jim Dickerson.

Other days, she would ride her bicycle through the streets of Corydon or spend her summers at the swimming pool in the late 1970s, while her mother Roberta Chambers practiced law.

“Once I got into junior high, I was real active in 4-H, sports and clubs,” Relph said. “I think that taught leadership skills.”

From this humble beginning, the Honorable Dusti Relph now begins her duties as district judge—the first woman to serve in that capacity in the history of Iowa’s fifth judicial district, which includes Polk County.

Sep 8, 2014, 08:55













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