• Updated
  • 0

BONNER COUNTY, Idaho - A boating accident on Wednesday, June 29 on the Pend Oreille River which capsized the boat left one dead and three missing. Bonner County Sheriff's Office (BCSO) states they've recovered and identified the bodies of the other three boaters.

  • 0

As the family of an 11-year-old boy who died at Adventureland amusement park goes to court against the park, U.S. Rep. Cindy Axne has attempted to make the accident a campaign issue. The Democratic representative, who seeks re-election in Iowa’s 3rd District, released two campaign ads in June tying her opponent, Iowa Sen. Zach Nunn, […]

The post Rep. Cindy Axne defends ad attacking Sen. Zach Nunn on Adventureland ties appeared first on Iowa Capital Dispatch.

  • Updated
  • 0

Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

(NEW YORK) -- A week after the U.S. Supreme Court voted to strike down Roe v. Wade, ending a nearly 50-year precedent, several governors are moving to protect abortion rights in their states.

On Friday, New York is expected to pass a constitutional amendment guaranteeing access to abortion during a special session initially called to rewrite state gun permit laws in the wake of another Supreme Court decision that rolled back the state's concealed carry restrictions.

The measure, which has been supported by Gov. Kathy Hochul, would codify the right to an abortion and the right to contraception in the state's constitution. It would also update the existing Equal Rights Amendment to extend protections to several new classes, including on the basis of sex (including sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, pregnancy, pregnancy outcomes, reproductive healthcare and autonomy), disability, national origin, ethnicity and age.

The state Senate passed the measure Friday afternoon, sending it to the Assembly, which is also expected to pass it. An amendment to the state's constitution would ultimately be decided by voters in a referendum after passing two separately elected state legislatures.

"We refuse to stand idly by while the Supreme Court attacks the rights of New Yorkers," Hochul said on Twitter while sharing a proclamation to add the equal rights resolution to the state legislature's session agenda on Friday.

In neighboring New Jersey, Gov. Phil Murphy signed into law Friday afternoon abortion bills that protect health care providers and out-of-state patients. One bill bans the extradition of people who get or perform abortions in New Jersey to states that criminalize the procedure, and the second prohibits state agencies from assisting in investigations that release their information to other states.

The bills swiftly passed the state legislature in the wake of the Supreme Court decision impacting Roe.

"While others throughout the country are revoking a woman’s right to reproductive freedom, New Jersey will continue to defend this fundamental right in our state," Murphy said in a statement Friday.

The laws follow other actions by the state to protect abortion rights in anticipation of Roe falling. In January, Murphy signed a bill that codified the right to an abortion into state law.

In Connecticut, a new law strengthening abortion rights goes into effect on Friday. The law, which was signed by the governor in May, protects medical providers and patients seeking abortion care who may be traveling to Connecticut from states that have outlawed abortion. It also expands abortion access in Connecticut by expanding the type of practitioners eligible to perform certain abortion-related care.

As the state becomes a "safe harbor" state for abortion care, Lamont also issued an open letter Friday urging out-of-state businesses to relocate to Connecticut, "a state that supports the rights of women and whose actions and laws are unwavering in support of tolerance and inclusivity."

"With the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, there are many states across the country outlawing a woman's right to make her own reproductive choices. Not here in Connecticut. Not as long as I'm governor," Lamont said in a video message, asking businesses to consider the state as a place where their employees and customers may better identify with its values.

Lamont also touted the state's policies around paid family leave, child care and education for those seeking to start a family.

Twenty-six states are certain or likely to ban abortion with the fall of Roe, according to the Guttmacher Institute, a reproductive health policy research organization.

In the wake of the Supreme Court's decision, President Joe Biden is scheduled to meet virtually on Friday with nearly a dozen governors, including Lamont and Hochul, to discuss the administration's efforts to protect access to reproductive care, according to a White House official.

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

  • Updated
  • 0

HELENA, Mont. - Schools across the Treasure State are continuing to test for lead in drinking water and remediate any plumbing fixtures that show elevated levels of lead to help keep students and staff safe.

  • 0

Citing an “immediate danger” to the public, state licensing officials have issued an emergency order restricting a Fort Dodge pharmacy’s ability to compound certain drugs for customers. According to the Iowa Board of Pharmacy, Daniel Pharmacy of 1114 Central Ave., Fort Dodge, has “had ample time to comply with applicable standards for compounding with hazardous […]

The post Citing ‘immediate danger,’ state places restrictions on pharmacy’s license appeared first on Iowa Capital Dispatch.

  • Updated
  • 0

Craig Ruttle-Pool/Getty Images

(NEW YORK) -- New York lawmakers introduced legislation Friday that would ban the concealed carry of guns in a "sensitive location," including Times Square and all mass public transportation, according to a draft of the bill.

The bill comes after a Supreme Court ruling overturned a state law that limited who could get concealed carry permits to people who had "proper cause."

Sensitive places where guns cannot be carried include the subway, trains, buses and ferries, as well as government buildings, houses of worship, schools, libraries, public playgrounds, public parks, zoos, homeless shelters and polling places, according to the legislation.

New York Gov. Kathy Hochul announced lawmakers' intent to establish "sensitive places" legislation on Wednesday. The legislation was introduced in the state Senate during a special session called by Hochul that began Thursday.

The bill also seeks to ban the carry of guns on all private property by default, unless the owner of the property has signage permitting guns or has otherwise expressed consent to guns being permitted.

The law makes exceptions for law enforcement, peace officers, active duty military personnel and security, who would be allowed to carry guns in sensitive places. Those engaging in lawful hunting are also allowed to carry guns in sensitive locations.

The law would make carrying guns in the banned areas a felony offense.

A state-wide license and record database created and maintained by police will be checked on a monthly basis to determine continued accuracy and whether a person is no longer a valid license holder. The records are to be checked against records for criminal convictions, criminal indictments, mental health, extreme risk protection orders and orders of protections.

Another database would be created and maintained by police for ammunition sales.

Gun and ammunition sellers and dealers will also have to keep a record of all their transactions involving guns and ammunition.

The bill will also add a vehicle requirement to existing safe storage laws, requiring gun owners to lock up their guns in an appropriate safe storage depository out of sight from outside the vehicle and remove ammunition from the gun. Otherwise, gun owners would not be allowed to leave their firearm out of their immediate possession or in a car.

Hochul, in introducing the legislation on Wednesday, said this measure is meant to cut down on gun thefts from cars.

Currently, New York law requires gun owners to get safe storage for their guns, keeping them locked up, if they have children at home aged 16 or younger. The new legislation lifts that age requirement to 18 years old.

Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.

  • 0

Schools are no longer able to mandate vaccines, unemployment benefits last 10 fewer weeks, and Iowans can be charged with elder abuse starting Friday, July 1, as many of laws from the Iowa Legislature’s 2022 session take effect. These may be the final changes to Iowa law coming in 2022, as the governor has said […]

The post Your guide to Iowa’s new laws appeared first on Iowa Capital Dispatch.

  • 0

FRIDAY, July 1, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Hinting at a future alternative to opioid painkillers, scientists have developed a tiny implant designed to ease post-surgery pain and then dissolve once the job is done.

  • 0

The father of Daniel Gingerich, a former Iowa puppy mill operator sentenced to jail and fined $60,000 for animal-welfare violations, has been cited for operating an unlicensed dog-breeding operation in Ohio. Last year, federal officials pursued civil charges against Daniel Gingerich for dozens of regulatory violations at his dog breeding operation, Maple Hill Puppies, in […]

The post Banned dog breeder’s father cited for unlicensed breeding facility in Ohio appeared first on Iowa Capital Dispatch.

  • Updated
  • 0

FRIDAY, July 1, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The natural gas being piped into your home contains a wide array of toxic chemicals, including nearly two dozen so harmful they're classified as hazardous air pollutants, a new study says.

  • 0

Starting Friday, Iowans will see reduced unemployment benefits, child care providers will see relaxed regulations and third-party food delivery services will face fines for using a restaurant’s logo or menu without permission.

  • Updated
  • 0

Starting Friday, Iowans will see reduced unemployment benefits, child care providers will see relaxed regulations and third-party food delivery services will face fines for using a restaurant’s logo or menu without permission.

  • Updated
  • 0

Starting Friday, Iowans will see reduced unemployment benefits, child care providers will see relaxed regulations and third-party food delivery services will face fines for using a restaurant’s logo or menu without permission.

  • Updated
  • 0

Starting Friday, Iowans will see reduced unemployment benefits, child care providers will see relaxed regulations and third-party food delivery services will face fines for using a restaurant’s logo or menu without permission.

  • Updated
  • 0

FRIDAY, July 1, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- New York City's Mayor Eric Adams announced Thursday that the city has launched the first-of-their-kind mobile COVID-19 testing units that will also dispense the antiviral drug Paxlovid to those who test positive for the virus.

  • 0

Nearly 50 million Americans will travel for the holiday weekend, making this the second busiest Independence Day since 2000.  In Iowa, the Des Moines International Airport is anticipating high travel rates. From June 30 through July 4, over 26,800 passengers are expected to process through Des Moines Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Security Checkpoint.  Iowa’s largest […]

The post High travel rates expected for the holiday weekend appeared first on Iowa Capital Dispatch.