City of Corydon

 During the April 4 regular Corydon city council meeting, Jared Chambers, President of the Wayne Community Foundation was in attendance to present a door opening opportunity for the City of Corydon. The Wayne Community Foundation is a non-profit and tax-exempt organization that receives and distributes funds used to benefit all of Wayne County and its Citizens.

“I am here on behalf of the Wayne Community Foundation where I am currently the President and took over that role at the beginning of this year,” Chambers began. “Working within the request of a donor advised fund we currently have in place, and this donor advised fund wishes to remain anonymous, there is potential funding available specifically to the City of Corydon to perform from a qualified engineering firm, a comprehensive street inventory and improvement plan.”

“From my previous construction days work over the years, some engineering firms refer to these as pavement maintenance reports and other names and so on,” Chambers continued. “They target all the infrastructure whether it be storm sewers, sewer main or water main, pavement, curb and gutter, sidewalks, the whole nine yards. They provide either a 10-year plan, 15-year or 20-year plan, however you specify.”

“My question to you tonight council members, would the City of Corydon be interested in filling out a request for a proposal, a RFP as everybody knows them as, for a project like this knowing there is potential funding available to pay for this comprehensive plan?” asked Chambers.

“Absolutely,” said council member Eric Jaeckel.

“The donor advised fund, and again this is going to remain anonymous, asked that if you agree to do this that you send the RFP’s out to engineering firms that have experience in doing this type of project,” said Chambers.

“Do you have names of any firms?” asked council member Stan Rupe.

“We can get them for you by all means,” said Chambers. “We need a roadmap for what we can look towards for the future. The big idea here or thought process is to build this roadmap and not keep applying a Band-Aid. Let’s get something started so the citizens of Corydon can know this is a roadmap that the City of Corydon is going to look to follow.”

“So in order to take advantage of this opportunity it would have to be established so that future councils would have to abide by it somehow, someway,” said Jaeckel. “This is a gift to the city, so it’s incumbent upon us to manage this gift into the future, even though we won’t be here as part of the future.”

“This is for the future plan, this is the roadmap that is going to open the doors for the city,” Chambers responded. “It’s going to give an assessment of every street in Corydon, Iowa and outline it to say this sewer main was installed this year. The water main was installed this year. The storm sewer was installed this year. This type of pavement whether it’s concrete or asphalt, and here is the engineer’s estimate of what it is going to cost to replace.”

“That’s kind of what we are working on now,” said City of Corydon mayor Dennis Moorman. “We are putting in water and sewer under streets and we aren’t going to fix those streets now.”

“Have you put together a comprehensive plan for all of Corydon for 10-years or 15-years?” asked Chambers.

“No we have to see how far our money is going on this one,” said Moorman.

“That’s why I am here,” said Chambers.

“We kind of have to see what it’s going to take for money to do all that,” said Moorman.

“With this plan we don’t have to wonder what are we going to do, this is a professional opinion for the next step,” said council member Amber Rodgers.

“It’s going to open the doors possibly again from a qualified engineering firm that specializes in these, there may be additional money that could come from this donor advised fund to begin the project,” said Chambers.

“I’m in agreement and I would concur this is something I would vote in favor of,” said Jaeckel. “It will have to be put on the agenda for the next meeting and we may want to have a work session just to pass some ideas around.”

Rhonda Guy, a Water and Waste Water Operator in Central Iowa was in attendance for discussion on ways she would be willing to help the city fill the position for the city’s Water and Waste Water Operator. She put together a proposal and submitted it to the city and council that included mileage and all expenses as a flat fee. If hired, emergencies would be the only hourly rate charged from the time of leaving her driveway.

“Several folks reached out to us, council and otherwise and I put together a proposal,” said Guy. “I know you have your city guys working to become certified and I will gladly help them do training when it comes to the next level.”

“I have talked to both legal counsel and the League of Cities, and I want to go on record to say we did not do anything wrong,” said City Clerk Ann Stevens. “Both of them told me there is not a state law or state code on posting ads for contractors, if it had been a job or position with the city that would be different. Our legal counsel has advised that we get somebody on as soon as possible, that Chariton has just been fined for not having somebody on board right away. I have talked to Dennis and I have talked to Jack (Pershy) and right now we are up at the end of the fiscal year. I would like the council to consider Jack maybe for short term.”

“The way it turned out for the city, we should have really went with Rod (Parham),” said Moorman. “It would have been cheaper all the way around and then he would have been here to inspect the projects, so now we are going to be paying the piper. So that was one mistake we did.”

“Will he reconsider?” asked Jaeckel.

“He didn’t talk like it,” said Moorman.

Pershy will be helping the city in a short-term contract while city employee Brandon Trower attends classes and works on getting his certification needed.

The city accepted the highest sealed bid of $28,240.54 received from Mike Thomas, for the building on 110 South Franklin Street that will be taken to a public hearing on Wednesday, April 17 at 7:00 p.m. Another bid was received in an email, however the advertisement requested bids be received by sealed mailed bids or hand delivered to City Hall, making that bid non-valid.

A sealed bid from Shawn’s Lawns was approved for $1,104.66 for outside improvements to the Community Building at Walden Park.

Larry Wilkinson was in attendance to thank Mayor Moorman and the council for their work with I.T.C. over the power cables not being moved now into the residential area.

The council approved resolutions 2019-11 through 2019-15 approving Hall Engineering’s Agreements for work within the city. These resolutions include the water main replacement projects on South DeKalb Street from West Marion Street to West Madison Street, DeKalb Street to South West Street north of elementary school and West Marion Street from South DeKalb Street to South West Street. Also included is the sanitary sewer system rehabilitation project on West Monroe relining and manhole rehabilitation and addendum for additional locations to project street improvements for 2019.

The council approved a contract with Jeff Ellis & Associates, Inc for 2019 services for the Prairie Trails Aquatic Center and a resolution to set a rate for a city employee to catch and deliver dogs to the Corydon Vet Clinic. A tax abatement was also approved for Legacy & Investments LLC for their commercial building.

The next City of Corydon meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, April 17 at 7 p.m. with a work session on Wednesday, April 10 at 7 p.m.

Recommended for you

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.